Bon Scott AC/DC - I remember Ronald Belford Scott - BON SCOTT FOREVER
Bon Scott – AC/DC 1974–1980

Bon Scott – AC/DC 1974–1980

Bon Scott replaced Dave Evans as the lead singer of AC/DC on 24 October 1974, when it became obvious the band and Evans were heading in different directions, with Evans having personal More »

Bon Scott – Fraternity 1970–1974

Bon Scott – Fraternity 1970–1974

Bon Scott moved to Adelaide in 1970 and joined the progressive rock band Fraternity. Fraternity released the LPs Livestock and Flaming Galah before touring the UK in 1973, where they changed their More »

Bon Scott – Early Years 1946–1964

Bon Scott – Early Years 1946–1964

Ronald Belford Scott was born on 9 July 1946 at the Fyfe Jamieson Maternity Hospital, Forfar, Scotland to Charles Belford “Chick” Scott (d. 1999) and Isabelle Cunningham “Isa” Mitchell (1917–2011), and grew More »

 

Bon Scott – AC/DC 1974–1980

The late, great Bon Scott pictured here at a show in LA in 1978. Tragically, he died of acute alcoholic poisoning in London on February 19, 1980 - aged only 33. (Photo by Chris Walter/WireImage)

Bon Scott replaced Dave Evans as the lead singer of AC/DC on 24 October 1974, when it became obvious the band and Evans were heading in different directions, with Evans having personal clashes with band members and management.

With the Young brothers as lead and rhythm guitarists, session drummer Tony Currenti (see AC/DC lineups) and George Young as a temporary bassist, AC/DC released High Voltage, their first LP in Australia in 1975. Within a few months Currenti was replaced byPhil Rudd and Mark Evans was hired as a permanent bassist, and AC/DC began recording their second album T.N.T., which was released in Australia in December 1975. The first AC/DC album to gain international distribution however was a compilation of tracks from the first two albums, also entitled High Voltage, which was released in May 1976. Another studio album, Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap was released in the same year, but only in Australia; the international version of the album was released in November 1976 in the UK and in March 1981 in the U.S., with a different track listing.

In the following years, AC/DC gained further success with their albums Let There Be Rock and Powerage. The 1978 release of Powerage marked the debut of bassist Cliff Williams (who had replaced Mark Evans), and with its harder riffs, followed the blueprint set by Let There Be Rock. The album was the last produced by Harry Vanda and George Young with Bon Scott on vocals and is claimed to be AC/DC’s most underrated album. Only one single was released forPowerage – “Rock ‘n’ Roll Damnation” – and gave AC/DC their highest chart position at the time, reaching #24. An appearance at the Apollo Theatre in Glasgow during thePowerage tour was recorded and released as If You Want Blood You’ve Got It.

The band’s sixth album, Highway To Hell, was produced by Robert “Mutt” Lange and was released in 1979. It became AC/DC’s first LP to break the U.S. top 100, eventually reaching #17, and it propelled AC/DC into the top ranks of hard rock acts.